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20130113
20130121
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Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
and undermine their idealism. if we permit our economy to drift and decline, the vulnerable will suffer most. we must live up to the calling we share. civility is not a tactic or a sentiment. it is the determined choice of trust over cynicism, of community over chaos. and this commitment, if we keep it, is a way to shared accomplishment. america, at its best, is also courageous. our national courage has been clear in times of depression and war, when defending common dangers defined our common good. now we must choose if the example of our fathers and mothers will inspire us or condemn us. we must show courage in a time of blessing by confronting problems instead of passing them on to future generations. together, we will reclaim america's schools, before ignorance and apathy claim more young lives. we will reform social security and medicare, sparing our children from struggles we have the power to prevent. and we will reduce taxes, to recover the momentum of our economy and reward the effort and enterprise of working americans. we will build our defenses beyond challenge, lest weakness invite
. the creation of a representative democracy across 13 large land areas that have different economies, different modes of production, very different religious values and different histories, a very different outlook on things. when they came together, i think that the 55 people who gathered in philadelphia had most of them, not all of them, most of them had an imperative that they were going to create something like a representative democracy or republic of all of these different elements, and they have almost everything but that and they can with a whole lot of different ideas about what they were going to do. and nobody came away with exactly what they wanted. most people didn't come away with anything close to what they wanted except that a very remarkable thing. >> host: these are very polarized times. the congress and the 79 piece is as polarized as today in your book if we think the media is polarized or in tents today and we haven't seen anything with compared to then. so how were they able to compromise than in the similarly polarized times it is hard to compromise that. >> guest: they d
across 13 large land areas that had different economies and different modes of production, different religious values, different histories, different outlooks on things. when they came together, i think that the 55 people who gathered in philadelphia had most of them -- though not all of them but most of them had an imperative that they were going to create something like a representative democracy or a republic out of all of these different elements, and they had to give up almost everything but that. they came with a whole lot of different ideas about what they were going to do, and nobody came away with exactly what they wanted. most people didn't come away with anything close to what they wanted except that very remarkable thing. >> host: now, these are very polarized times with congress in the 1790s polarized or more polarized than today. in your book you think the media is polarized today we haven't seen anything so how were they able to compromise than well it's hard for us to compromise now? >> guest: they didn't like it any better than we like it and they got mad about it. i
of a representative democracy across 13 large land areas that have different economies, different modes of production, different religious values, different histories, different outlooks on things. when they came together, the 55 who gathered in philadelphia had most of them, not all of them. most of them had an imperative that they were going to create something like a representative democracy out of all these different element. they had to give up almost everything but that. they came with a lot of different ideas about what they were going to do and nobody came away with what they wanted. except a very remarkable thing. >> host: these are very polarized times. congress and the 1790s is as polarized. if we think the media polarized our intent today, we have been anything. so how were they able to compromise plan went similarly polarized times it's hard for us to compromise them? >> guest: they didn't like it better than we liked it. somebody said in the ever been able to track this boat. maybe you know who sent it. politics is compromise, everything else is theater. we have a lot of theater right n
economy. the financial well-being of the american people is not leverage to be used. the full faith and credit of the united states of america is not a bargaining chip. >> you know, it looks like republicans are up against another wall. but they're not going to be able to get -- they're not going to be able to get, quite frankly, some things they really want, if they're serious, are important. spending issues. but this is -- he's got them again. >> here's the problem with the republican party being owned by extremists on issues not related to the debt. let me tell you something, the president of the united states, it's laughable that he would talk about republicans not being responsible on debt issues when this president has been in the white house since january the 20th, 2009, and he has yet to do anything significant on social security or medicare. he cut medicare, so he could start a new entitlement program. that's not making medicare more solvent. he hasn't done anything to curb the costs of medical expenses, which he said he was going to do. he did nothing. he struck back room
have the will to the poverty a priority with in this country? >> you have to have the real economy. but we have now? i am amazed -- you could talk about public education, we could talk about health care. everyone knows that a single payer health care system would -- insurance would cover everyone. insurance companies would be gone. cost, quality, access would be at a premium in terms of our ability to be a civil society if we had a single payer health care system. we could generate almost 3 million jobs, which would serve to stimulate the rest of the economy when you are building -- and actually taking care of the people. they know that in washington. viable. -- valuable. they just want to privatize it. i think you all doing a beautiful job -- the nurses appreciate you so deeply. honestly, the progressive caucus, the black caucus -- but one of the things that you said, and i completely agree, is that you have got to push. we have got to treat a movement in this country -- occupy was a moment. it needs to start up and keep going -- it needs to bring millions of people with it. the r
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)